Ann Logan|Cross Stitch Patterns to Download|Insects

Insects


Use a sharp pair of small scissors to avoid frayed ends on your floss. There are many embroidery scissors or thread clippers to choose from. The most useful size of embroidery scissor for cross stitch is probably 3/12 inch or 4 inch. It is a convenient size for snipping ends of floss while you stitch. Clip the floss with a small tail or with no tail at all. It’s a matter of choice. Beware of ends showing through the fabric. We have many fancy designer scissors and several more plain scissors to choose from. Some of my favorites are by Gingher and they are truly collectors items. They come in a variety of colorful handles and there are new ones every season. Right now the newest one is called Tessa. Store your scissors in the sheath that they come with or in a scissor block if you collect scissors. A scissor block is similar to a knife block.

Beetle
45 x 53 stitches 16 colors
Bug
39 x 40 stitches 2 colors
Grasshopper
90 x 74 stitches 7 colors
Spider
51 x 47 stitches 1 colors
Spider
138 x 138 stitches 18 colors
Ladybug
40 x 50 stitches 25 colors
Bee
51 x 41 stitches 10 colors
Ladybug
70 x 40 stitches 23 colors
Ant
130 x 60 stitches 17 colors
Bugs
45 x 24 stitches 6 colors



See more


The biggest nuisance to any cross stitcher, new or experienced, is the dreaded knotted floss.

Virtually everyone who has ever completed a project has experienced a tangle which has turned into a knot. It's always worth taking time to untangle the mistake, particularly if you're framing a project, otherwise it will be riddled with visible lumps.

AfricaAliensAlphabetsAngelsAnimalsAustraliaBalletBathroomBirdsBookmarksBuddhismBuildingsBulgariaButterfliesCactiCanadaCatsCelticChevron StyleChildrenChinaChristmasComputersCosmeticsCosmosCushion CoversDinosauresDogsDragonsEasterEgyptEmojisEthiopiaFaberge EggsFairiesFarm AnimalsFlagsFlowersForgivenessFranceFreeFruitsGermanyGreat People of the WorldGreeceHalloweenHatsHawaiiHorsesHungaryIndiaIndonesiaInsectsIslamIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJudaicaKidsKoreaLadiesLatviaLeavesLithuaniaLondonMealMermaidsMilitaryMiscellaneous designsMomDayMonstersMoroccoMushroomsMusicNatureNetherlandsNew YearNew ZelandNorwayOrnamentsPaganismPaintingsPakistanPatterns for Bed SheetPhilippinesPragueReligiousRussiaSages of the WorldSayingsSea HabitantsSilhouettesSimple MotifsSocotra IslandSpainSportSri LankaStationerySwedenTablewareTaiwanThailandToysUkrainaUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States of AmericaValentine's DayVegetablesVehiclesVietnamWeddingWestern ThemeZodiac Signs
When doing the cross stiches on garments the waste canvas is used.

Baste the waste canvas onto the right side of the regular fabric. Work the cross stitches through both layers of fabric. When all the stitching is done, the waste canvas is cut away around the design. Soak the design in water. This will disolve the starch that holds the threads of the waste canvas together. What is left of the waste canvas can then be pulled out from under the stitches, one thread at a time, with a pair of tweezers.
In cross-stitching correct tension is important. Having too strong or too loose of a tension can totally destroy the impression of your project. The threads should be flat against the fabric you are using, but not too tight, so that they are actually pulling the fabric in any way.
Buy all your supplies for a project at the start. Thread comes in dye lots that may vary slightly between batches.
Many stitchers prefere to use an embroidery hoop or a scrollbar stretcher. Nonetheless, it's still many times the fabric, which is usually made of cotton, eventualy becomes rumpled or wrinkled during the stitching process. Properly ironing the fabric before framing is a quick, easy way of eliminating wrinkles and leaving your cross stitch project looking its best.