Ann Logan

Great People of the World


Most designs supposed to be done using two strands of embroidery floss. But the floss is usually sold in six strand packaging.
So before threading your needle, you should separate all the 6 strands.
To do it just cut somewhat about 15”-18” (35 - 45 cm) of the thread. Hold it near the top with one hand allowing the bottom to untwist. Now pull each ply upward with the other hand. Carefully - one at a time.
Combine the necessary number of strands (typically two) and save the remaining for the next usage.
Mozart
86 x 75 stitches 1 color
Einstein
97 x 97 stitches 2 colors
Elvis
98 x 97 stitches 1 color
Martin Luther
140 x 120 stitches 25 colors
Francois Rabelais
150 x 200 stitches 17 colors
Rabindranath Tagore
119 x 159 stitches 17 colors
Rambam
122 x 156 stitches 16 colors
Ibn Sina
122 x 156 stitches 13 colors
Confucius
112 x 160 stitches 14 colors



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Pick the color of floss you are starting with and cut a length about 18 inches long. If you go much longer than this, the thread is more likely to get knotted when you stitch.

Most embroidery floss is made up of six strands of thread twisted together. Depending on the fabric you are using, you will typically stitch with only one or two strands at a time.

To separate out a strand, hold the floss with one hand and pinch the end of one strand with the other. Gently and slowly pull the strand up and out until it is separated from the remaining strands. Only pull one strand at a time. Pulling multiple strands may cause the floss to knot.

AfricaAliensAlphabetsAngelsAnimalsAustraliaBalletBathroomBirdsBookmarksBuddhismBuildingsBulgariaButterfliesCactiCanadaCatsCelticChevron StyleChildrenChinaChristmasComputersCosmeticsCosmosCushion CoversDinosauresDogsDragonsEasterEgyptEmojisEthiopiaFaberge EggsFairiesFarm AnimalsFlagsFlowersForgivenessFranceFreeFruitsGermanyGreat People of the WorldGreeceHalloweenHatsHawaiiHorsesHungaryIndiaIndonesiaInsectsIslamIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJudaicaKidsKoreaLadiesLatviaLeavesLithuaniaLondonMealMermaidsMilitaryMiscellaneous designsMomDayMonstersMoroccoMushroomsMusicNatureNetherlandsNew YearNew ZelandNorwayOrnamentsPaganismPaintingsPakistanPatterns for Bed SheetPhilippinesPragueReligiousRussiaSages of the WorldSayingsSea HabitantsSilhouettesSimple MotifsSocotra IslandSpainSportSri LankaStationerySwedenTablewareTaiwanThailandToysUkrainaUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States of AmericaValentine's DayVegetablesVehiclesVietnamWeddingWestern ThemeZodiac Signs
It can be tempting to leave your cross stitch project attached to the embroidery hoop, either overnight or when it's not in use - but don't! Those hoops are great tools for working, keeping your fabric tight and firm, making the stitch process easier, but they can damage the fabric if they're left inside for long periods of inactivity.
Our advice is to give your project a proper rest - loosen the tension and place your work-in-progress somewhere safe where it won't get damaged or creased.
It is very important to work slowly when you try new techniques or stitching fibers such as metallic flosses. That way you learn how to do it properly without accidentally messing up your pattern along the way.
Don’t make long jumps across the back of your fabric with the thread because they might show through on the front. When moving to a new area that is more than a few stitches away, you should end your thread and then begin it again in the new spot.
Buy all your supplies for a project at the start. Thread comes in dye lots that may vary slightly between batches.