Ann Logan|Cross Stitch Patterns to Download|Faberge Eggs

Faberge Eggs


Cross stitching on Waste Canvas / soluble canvas.

This is a method of doing cross stitch on a particular type of fabric which will tear off after the work is done - this way you can cross stitch on any type of fabric, regardless of the fact that the eave is not prominent on the fabric. The way you do it is to keep the waste canvas on the garment and work the design. After the work is done, the waste canvas is pulled away thread by tread, after slightly wetting it. The work will remain on the garment. Soluble canvas will wash away when soaked in warm water.
Renaissance Faberge Egg
152 x 125 stitches 30 colors
Rosebud Faberge Egg
110 x 173 stitches 25 colors
Hen Faberge Egg
133 x 142 stitches 29 colors
Pansy Faberge Egg
90 x 140 stitches 24 colors
Rothschild Faberge Egg
55 x 120 stitches 26 colors
Rosetrellis Faberge Egg
125 x 152 stitches 29 colors
Book Faberge Egg
100 x 195 stitches 29 colors
Tzar Nicolay Faberge Egg
100 x 190 stitches 30 colors
Tree Faberge Eggt
98 x 195 stitches 28 colors
Gold Peacocks Faberge Egg
86 x 130 stitches 29 colors
Lily of the Valey Faberge Egg
88 x 138 stitches 48 colors
Cream Faberge Egg
102 x 187 stitches 39 colors
Apple Blossom Faberge Egg
119 x 105 stitches 46 colors
Faberge Coronation Egg
116 x 164 stitches 47 colors



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The biggest nuisance to any cross stitcher, new or experienced, is the dreaded knotted floss.

Virtually everyone who has ever completed a project has experienced a tangle which has turned into a knot. It's always worth taking time to untangle the mistake, particularly if you're framing a project, otherwise it will be riddled with visible lumps.

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Preserving the direction of your stitches is very importent. Once you choose it don't change, stick with it unless your project specifically calls for it. It helps you to avoid your project looking haphazard and sloppy.
You can cross stitch on different kinds of evenweave fabric. It may be evenweave linen, Aida cloth, waste canvas etc. It is largely a matter of your personal preference.
Just remember: the number of stitches per inch (or per cm) can drastically change the look of your ready project.
Fabric with a higher stitch will produce smaller and finer designs.
It is well known that cross-stitch is very addictive. Especially when you feel that you have enough time to be alone with the thread and needle. Do not give in! Take a break from time to time, putting off the thread and needle while resting your eyes and hands.
If you are too keen on your craft, use the alarm clock. When the alarm goes off, it’s time to put aside the fabric and other cross-stitch accessories and get some rest.
If you want accurate stitching without counting every stitch you may want to draw gridlines on your cloth. Recently pregrid fabric has become available which is a blessing for the crossstitchers.