Ann Logan|Cross Stitch Patterns to Download|Aliens

Aliens


Pick the color of floss you are starting with and cut a length about 18 inches long. If you go much longer than this, the thread is more likely to get knotted when you stitch.

Most embroidery floss is made up of six strands of thread twisted together. Depending on the fabric you are using, you will typically stitch with only one or two strands at a time.

To separate out a strand, hold the floss with one hand and pinch the end of one strand with the other. Gently and slowly pull the strand up and out until it is separated from the remaining strands. Only pull one strand at a time. Pulling multiple strands may cause the floss to knot.
Alien
39 x 31 stitches 10 colors
Alien Ship
41 x 30 stitches 12 colors
Spaceship
106 x 93 stitches 13 colors
Aliens
113 x 48 stitches 10 colors
Alien
69 x 118 stitches 22 colors
Alien Ship
107 x 77 stitches 22 colors



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Many stitchers prefere to use an embroidery hoop or a scrollbar stretcher. Nonetheless, it's still many times the fabric, which is usually made of cotton, eventualy becomes rumpled or wrinkled during the stitching process. Properly ironing the fabric before framing is a quick, easy way of eliminating wrinkles and leaving your cross stitch project looking its best.

AfricaAliensAlphabetsAngelsAnimalsAustraliaBalletBathroomBirdsBookmarksBuddhismBuildingsBulgariaButterfliesCactiCanadaCatsCelticChevron StyleChildrenChinaChristmasComputersCosmeticsCosmosCushion CoversDinosauresDogsDragonsEasterEgyptEmojisEthiopiaFaberge EggsFairiesFarm AnimalsFlagsFlowersForgivenessFranceFreeFruitsGermanyGreat People of the WorldGreeceHalloweenHatsHawaiiHorsesHungaryIndiaIndonesiaInsectsIslamIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJudaicaKidsKoreaLadiesLatviaLeavesLithuaniaLondonMealMermaidsMilitaryMiscellaneous designsMomDayMonstersMoroccoMushroomsMusicNatureNetherlandsNew YearNew ZelandNorwayOrnamentsPaganismPaintingsPakistanPatterns for Bed SheetPhilippinesPragueReligiousRussiaSages of the WorldSayingsSea HabitantsSilhouettesSimple MotifsSocotra IslandSpainSportSri LankaStationerySwedenTablewareTaiwanThailandToysUkrainaUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States of AmericaValentine's DayVegetablesVehiclesVietnamWeddingWestern ThemeZodiac Signs
A cross stitch has two parts and can be worked in two ways – a complete stitch can be worked, or a number of half stitches may be stitched in one line and then completed on the return journey. Your cross stitch may face either direction but the most important rule is that all the top stitches should face the same direction!
Tension in your stitching is by far the easiest thing to correct, especially if you’re using a hoop – pull tight but not so tight that you stretch the hole at all. If you stitch in hand you have to be more careful.

I find that pulling the thread mostly through and then using my little finger in the hand holding the needle to “flick” the tail the final bit gives perfect tension and is reproducible for each stitch. Pay attention to the tension you’re applying as, if you stitch in different directions or do “patches” of stitching over the piece, you’ll pull it in weird directions.
Remember, cross-stitch is considered counted embroidery.
So count count count count again and double check your counting. It really helps minimize mistakes.
Gridding save you a lot of time (and your sanity too). Cross stitch is meant to be relaxing. Make your hobby hugely beneficial for your mental and physical health.
Cross stitch embroidery is a passion with some people – the idea of transferring a design and turning it into an abstract art on fabric with colourful thread is something which triggers their creativity big time – as it is for me. But people were cross stitching from about 500 AD.